Top 10 Most Iconic Buildings in New York City

Empire State Building

The famous Empire State building was established in 1931. It stands tall at 350 Fifth Avenue, between W33 and W34. As a matter of fact, it was the world’s tallest building for more than 40 years. Later, the World Trade Centre’s North Tower came up in 1972.

The Empire State building was designed by the American firm Shreve, Lamb, and Harmon in the Art Deco Style. Moreover, it comprises a steel frame with 6,500 windows penetrating an Indiana Limestone and granite facade. In 2005 the Empire State Building was named one of the Seven Wonders of the modern world.

The 86th floor offers an aesthetic view of New York City. The view from the deck is particularly stunning at sunrise. In addition to the spectacular view, the recently restored lobby with stunning Art Deco ceiling murals is a sight to behold.

Empire State Building

One World Trade Centre

One World Trade Centre is the tallest skyscraper in New York and the sixth tallest in the world. It was completed in July 2013. One World Trade Centre is located at 285 Fulton Street, Manhattan.

Furthermore, the design is a definite innovation in structure as it is a blend of urban design, safety, and sustainability. In fact, the World Trade Centre is known colloquially as the freedom tower.

One World Trade Centre

Chrysler Building

Constructed in 1928, it was the tallest skyscraper at that time until the Empire State Building surpassed it 11 months later. However, The Chrysler building remains the tallest brick skyscraper in the world and is a magnificent example of Art Deco architecture. It is addressed at  405 Lexington Avenue at 42nd Street.

It is usually open on weekdays. You can enjoy the colorful angular ceiling by Edward Turnbull.

Chrysler Building

American Radiator Building

The American Radiator Building is situated at 40 West 40th Street, in midtown Manhattan. The influence behind the design is the Finnish Architect Eliel Saarinen’s unbuilt Tribune Tower design. He combined both art deco and gothic styles. Initially it was built as office space in 1924.

In 1998 the British Architect David Chipperfield was employed to transform it into a quirky boutique hotel. Chipperfield restored all of the iconic exterior features, including the black brick with gold ornament and the dramatic lighting and created a revamped interior of equal prowess.

American Radiator Building

Flatiron Building

The Flatiron Building was designed in the Beaux-Arts style by Daniel Burnham. It is situated at 175, 5th Avenue. As a matter of fact, it was one of the first building to use a steel frame. In 1902 it was able to rise to 87m making it the taller in the city.

Over a century later Burnham’s design has undermined doubt and the Flatiron building has become one of New York’s most iconic images.

Flatiron Building

Hearst Tower

The Hearst Tower united the Hearst Corporation’s publications and communication companies. The building was done in the 20th century.

In addition to that, with symmetrically rigged corners and a unique backdrop to a large, bright four-story atrium, it was awarded the Emporis Skyscraper Award in 2006 as the best skyscraper of the year in the world. In fact, at the center, there is a water sculpture constructed with thousands of glass panels that boast the tower’s economic performance by using recycled rainwater to cool and humidify thermal conditions.

To explore the building, find it at 300 West 57th Street on Eighth Avenue, near Columbus Circle.

Hearst Tower

St. Patrick’s Cathedral

Made of expansive glass and steel monuments of modernity, St. Patrick’s Cathedral is the largest decorated Neo-Gothic Cathedral in North America. It is located on Fifth Avenue between 50th and 51st streets in Manhattan facing Rockefeller Center. James Renwick Jr designed the cathedral.

St. Patrick Cathedral

Grand Central Terminal

The Grand Central Terminal is located at 42nd Street and 3rd Avenue. In fact it is one of the largest train stations in the world by number of platforms. It has 67 tracks on two levels.

Grand Central Terminal

Rockefeller Center

The Rockefeller Center is located between the 48th and 51st street. It was developed almost 50 years ago and consists of 19 buildings across 12 acres. Today, the Rockefeller Centre is one of the last major building projects in the United States to incorporate a program of integrated public art. Sculptor Lee Lawrie contributed twelve individual pieces including the famous statue of Atlas facing Fifth Avenue.

The original 14 Art Deco office buildings are from the 1930s. One of them is a Modernist skyscraper across 51st Street in 1947. Furthermore, four other International-style towers were added in the 1960s and 1970s

In fact, the Rockefeller Centre is home to a broad range of high-profile facilities. They include NBC network headquarters, Radio City Music Hall entertainment venue, and the second-highest restaurant in the city, the Rainbow Room.

Rockefeller Center

Solomon R, Guggenheim Museum

The famous museum is located at 1071 Fifth Avenue, on the corner of East 89th Street in Upper East Manhattan.

It was founded in 1937. Usually, the museum is known as “The Guggenheim”. The museum showcases the early modernist avant-garde art. In fact, it is an iconic display of International Style architecture. Frank Lloyd Wright was the man behind the great masterpiece.

Apparently, he visioned a top-level piece with geometric paintings, contemporary art, and early modern art; from the famous Picasso’s mistress to Robert Mapplethorpe’s photographs.

With no doubt, Guggenheim Museum hosts one of the most significant collections of art in the world. However, it is the masterpiece they sit in that proclaims it a New York essential visit.

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